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California’s New Affordable Housing Laws – Part Three

Governor Brown signed 15 bills into law on September 29, 2017 that are designed to help address California's affordable housing crisis. The approved bills take different approaches to the housing shortage in California, including providing more funding for affordable housing development, streamlining local government approval of housing projects, restoring local government's authority to impose inclusionary housing requirements on private housing developers, and strengthening the state's anti-NIMBY laws.

The new laws have implications and obligations for municipalities, housing related public agencies, and private developers. To help explain the new affordable housing regulatory landscape, Meyers Nave is offering a complimentary, three-part webinar series addressing the most critical issues under the new laws. The first webinar covered SB 2, SB 3, AB 1505, AB 1598, and approaches being taken by local governments, including bond measures in Bay Area counties and a linkage fee in the City of Los Angeles. The second webinar covered SB 35, SB 540, AB 73, infrastructure financing districts and the use of program Environmental Impact Reports and Specific Plans. Please click here to obtain recordings of the first two webinars.

Please register below to attend the third and last webinar on February 8. Each webinar has been approved for one hour of general MCLE credit by the State Bar of California.

Third Webinar: Tightening State Requirements for Local Housing

The February 8 webinar will cover the following topics:

  • New Housing Element Law Requirements and New “No Net Loss” Requirements – State Tightening Local Accountability for Accommodating Fair Share of Housing Production (AB 1397, SB 166, AB 879, AB 72)
  • New Housing Accountability Act requirements – Putting Teeth in State Anti-NIMBY Laws (SB 167, AB 678, AB 1515)
  • Accessory Dwelling Unit Requirements – Making Second Units Workable for Homeowners (AB 494, SB 229)
  • Do’s and Don’ts for local governments
  • How developers can use the new laws to get housing projects approved