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Rancho Cordova’s Largest Mixed-Use Project

The Rancho Cordova City Council recently approved final amendments to the Rio Del Oro Specific Plan, the City’s largest land development project. This represents years of dedication and hard work from a multi-disciplinary team of Meyers Nave attorneys, including Adam Lindgren (Rancho Cordova City Attorney), Jose Sanchez (Rancho Cordova Assistant City Attorney), Kate Cook (Rancho Cordova Deputy City Attorney), Tim Cremin (Chair, Meyers Nave Climate Change and Green Initiatives Practice) and Adam Regele (Land Use and Environmental Law Associate). The Council’s extensive approvals included (1) Amendments to the Rio Del Oro Specific Plan, (2) Public Facilities Financing Plan, (3) Amended and Restated Development Agreements, (4) Large Lot Tentative Subdivision Map, (5) Master Phasing Plan, (6) Affordable Housing Plan and (7) Environmental Impact Report Addendum.

Rio Del Oro covers 3,828 acres and includes 12,189 residential units, one high school, two middle schools, six elementary schools, 157 acres of commercial space, 90 acres of business park, 269 acres of industrial park, 510 acres of wetland preserve, 121 acres of community park, 57 acres of neighborhood parks, and 16 miles of trails. Over the next 25 years, the project is expected to increase the City’s population by 40%. It will transform the site from mine tailings to a community of neighborhoods with schools, parks and shopping.

The project began in 2003, Tier One and the original environmental impact report were approved in 2010, and final Tier Two was approved in August 2016. The development can now move forward to begin processing individual projects, which would include small-lot tentative subdivision maps, grading plans, design review and building permits. Ground breaking and construction could start in 2018. As Mayor David Sander stated, “This is a historic day for Rancho Cordova. We are charting a path forward with one of the largest developments in the Sacramento region. Rio Del Oro sets a regional mark for how modern, suburban, upscale development can be done.”